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How do you stay thin?

Posted by looking forward, on Mon Sep 09, 2019 5:54 pm

how do so many of you stay so thin? i was thin before my surgery and right after but now cannot lose a pound  help  if you can

Reply by newyorktorque, on Mon Sep 09, 2019 8:25 pm

For me its partially because of the surgery that left me with short gut syndrome and I'm a healthy eater but I dont eat meat.  I should probably be eating more carbs (that will put the weight on).  Also if you are rendered disabled like me, it can make you more sedate and less active making it easy to put on weight.

Reply by vanessa1970, on Tue Sep 10, 2019 2:26 am

I walk everywhere. And I eat healthy. Don’t eat simple sugars and carbs and you won’t get the stabbing hunger pangs.

Reply by Bill, on Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:18 am

Hello looking forward. 

This is an interesting question and I look forward to reading the replies. 

From adolescence up until my surgery I was physically active and mostly a healthy eater. My weight did not change more than a few pounds at any time. After surgery My weight stayed the same but my stomach bulged so much that I looked as though I was pregnant. This was put down to a hernia so I wear a belt to hold it in. Last year I began to put on weight (not much, but significant in my case as my weight had been consistent until then). I tried to do more exercise, then I had my heart attack, so I felt that this method was probably not a good idea at this time. I then decided that I would measure out my food and cut down just a fraction each day on each meal. (not enough to practically notice except that I was measuring accurately so I was aware of the precise quantities). Over a period of a couple of months my weight gradually came back to my 'normal' so I have continued with the measuring techniques ever since and have had no more problems in that regard.

Everyone is so different in terms of their metabolism so what works for one person may well not work for someone else.

I hope this helps.

Best wishes

Bill  

Past Member
Reply by Past Member, on Tue Sep 10, 2019 6:22 am

I can't gain weigth for the life of me. I can eat junk food all week long and it just doesn't show on the scale. 

Reply by w30bob, on Tue Sep 10, 2019 9:34 am

I'm with withed.......for some (and it's hard to believe I'm saying this) putting on weight is very hard, and for some (like me and withed) it's impossible.  Ok, impossibe is a misnomer.  Us short-gutters could increase our weight a little bit if we got on Gattex, a daily hormonal injection that causes the villi in the bowel to increase in size and absorb more.   But other than that.......we can eat whatever and any quantity of it and never gain an ounce. As a side benefit, the bad stuff like cholesterol and fat can't stick to us or doesn't get absorbed.......so we can eat crap all day and it won't kill us.  As an example......I drink heavy whipping cream by the quart.  When my local Aldi's runs out of whipping cream (I buy a lot) I buy quarts of Half & Half and chug that.  I eat McDonalds every day, sometimes twice.  I just had a lippid panel done and my LDL/HDL/Triglycerides are all right smack in the middle of the normal range.  Most docs can't believe it.  A normal person would be gaining a few lbs a week and would have had a stroke or two if they ate like me.  How's that for a "silver lining" to an otherwise shit-stained brown cloud?  If there is a God I'm seriously concerned about his sense of humor.......and we need to talk. 

Looking forward..........do yourself a favor and contact a good Dietician that specializes in IBD.  There's a lot of work going on in clinical trials right now related to how what we eat directly affects gut flora, and although much of what they are finding out I think we already knew, once the medical community accepts it you're going to see a large scale push to modify the quality of food supplied and the contents. A smart Dietician already knows all this and can apply this knowledge to your situation.  I'm not saying that finding a good one will be easy, but they are out there.  Ask your Gastro for a recommendation and go from there.  If you need help just shout.

regards,

bob 

Reply by smashing, on Tue Sep 10, 2019 5:11 pm

Since I was diagnosed in October 2009 with Ulcerative Colitis I ate very little and my weight plummeted from 14stone to below 10 stone and stayed that way for years. 

Had ileostomy 09/2013 and the last couple of years my weight has gone back to that stage and won't bug yet I still eat next to nothing. Is there any way I can lose weight again?  My Gastro Consultant says I now need to live with it not what I wanted to hear

Reply by w30bob, on Wed Sep 11, 2019 8:06 am

Hi Guys,

  I found this site on the web regarding metabolism, which most seem to think can be increased to make you burn calories faster.  I found what they're saying interesting, so I figured I'd share. 

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000893.htm

 

regards,

bob

Reply by HeyHey, on Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:11 pm

Please love yourself as you are. I find it is better to have some extra weight after going through everything. 

Walk, exercise, enjoy. Do your best. Extra stress about weight is not helpful. And it depends how much you are talking about.

If obese, then do your best to lose. If 10-15 lbs, don't worry about it. The extra weight is a cushion if you are ill and have a hard time eating.

 

Reply by richichi, on Thu Sep 12, 2019 4:33 pm

Well Looking Forward,

I am in the same boat as you, since my surgery I have gained significantly and just last month I decided to give it a fight. I put myself on a low sugar, low sodium, 1500 calories per day diet. I monitor it with an app call "My Fitness Pal" that I fill in religiously every day. It keeps me focused. I have been averaging a 2 lb. loss per week which I think is fantastic. I'm Looking to drop 70 lbs :) no quick fix jsut a long haul.

I don't know how long this will last but my goal is to make this the new normal and being Italian it isn't easy. I wish & hope the best for you no matter which street you decide to take but I will say one more thing that I have learned in my 66 years on this planet .... "The mind can acheive incredible wonders if you just stay the course" Ron

Reply by Newstom, on Thu Sep 12, 2019 4:58 pm

I have put on about 28 lbs in 3 yrs. i have this big bulge around my stoma. Looks like a big boob and i cant hold it in. More annoying than anything but had a ct scan to rule out a hernia and at least all my organs are good but NO words for the bulge. I am still scared shitless to have a reversal so I dont know. I try exercising, aggravate my back then have to slow own again. Sorry a dont have an answer. 

Reply by Bgstrong, on Thu Sep 12, 2019 5:14 pm

I feel this.  Before my surgery 10 years ago, I was at my ideal weight and ate healthy and was active.

Now, I'm even more active than I was before (I go to the gym almost every day for anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour and a half) and I am the heaviest I have ever been in my life (30lbs heavier than pre-surgery).  And not muscle weight for sure (I'm squishy and my doctor has told me I'm overweight).

I bring this up because I'm wondering if its a food issue - and whether this is the same for any of you - but before surgery I was eating a lot of raw veggies and nuts and grains and leafy greens and fruits (as well as meats and healthy fats). But now, unless I want to take 4 hours to eat a single salad, any leafy green, raw veggie, nut or seed are instant impaction foods for me. So by default I'm just eating meats, healthy fats, and some carbs (though I try to watch my simple carbohydrates and sugars) which is definitely not the diet I had before surgery. 

Anyone else have this issue? 

I also know that I'm 10 years older so my metabolism in general can be a little different than it was when I was young. I dunno.  It's discouraging for sure, especially when it seems like so many ostomates don't have this issue. 

Reply by Newbie Dana, on Thu Sep 12, 2019 5:45 pm

Before cancer, I was a reasonably healthy, reasonably active very stable 135 pounds, meaning I could have stood to lose about 10-15 pounds, but not a really big deal (I am only 5'2''). With cancer treatments, post-treatment side effects, ostomy, and post-ostomy issues, I bounced around like a yo-yo, down to 114, back up to 135, back down to 120, up to 150 (considerably overweight!), and now slowly losing, currently at 147. I have a honking big peri-stomal hernia, and way too much fat in the belly, but I am working back to my goal of 120 pounds. It's really tough! I ride a bike for 30 minutes a day during the week and longer on weekends ( I usually end up with 5-6 days a week average, as life gets in the way). I eat healthy whenever I can, lots of salads, fruit and vegetables (I don't have too much trouble with impaction, although it took probably close to a year to move from a post-surgery low-residue basically unhealthy diet to a healthier one). I think the biggest thing was reducing the sugar in my diet, along with most red meat, and moving to a mostly vegetarian with some chicken/turkey/fish. And it's STILL taking forever to lose weight! I have had doctors say: post-menopause, medications increasing my appetite, not enough excercise (what??!!!), portion control on eating - you name it, at some point they've said it! Which really means, there's no single magic bullet, and it's going to take a long hard slog to finally lose the weight.

So, unfortunately, my best advice has to be hang in there, keep making small changes, and don't get discouraged. It's not going to be easy, but even little changes can add up to another pound gone, and then, eventually, another. Keep going, and know that while some people on this list can eat anything and not put on weight, there are many more of us in your boat with you. I am DETERMINED to finally lose this extra weight; I have faith that you will, too.

Reply by bryancohnracing, on Thu Sep 12, 2019 6:03 pm

I'm down 50 plus pounds since my colon cancer diagnosis, surgery and eventual recovery. On paper that sounds wonderful but I'm 5' 11" and 166 pounds. When I was diagnosed I was 6' 3/4' and 235!

My problem is because of the missing colon I don't absorb nutrients as I should AND my overall appetite is MEH at best. To keep energy levels up I try to eat a fair bit of protien, stay away from carbs and anything that can causes spikes in sugar levels. 

The good of all this is I can eat pretty much any damn thing I want, I just can't eat much of it......

Diz
Reply by Diz, on Thu Sep 12, 2019 10:18 pm

Although we all have stomas, we are all very individual. Before I was diagnosed with Crohn's and up to when I started losing weight and becoming illwhich led to the diagnosis, I was never fat but I had a healthy weight. I was busy with three small children, never off the go, but I had a good appetite and ate well. I have had 8 operations over the years, getting my stoma in the sixth. I've been thin, sometimes extremely, dangerously thin since my first operation and the only time I can maintain a weight over 100 lbs is when I am on steroids. I have so little gut left that I can't absorb calories or goodness from the food I eat and because of bad adhesions I cannot eat anything but mashed food in sauce, soups, and yoghurts. The only meat I can eat is chicken and fish.

So of course I stay very thin, but you wouldn't want the disability that comes with having no strength or energy. I don't know your circumstances, but you may be on medication that makes it difficult to lose weight or some other medical reason. If it bothers you talk to your doctor, but personally, I would revel in a few curves unless the weight was making me breathless or holding me back from leading the life I wanted. I wish you well, but remember, we are all different and that's what makes life so interesting.

Past Member
Reply by Past Member, on Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:11 pm

I’m on the same boat, I have most of my midsection fatter than the rest and with the ileostomy I’ve developed a round hard  bulge slightly above my belly. I feel bloated and deformed. I do walk and play with my a dog everyday, a good hour a half the morning and the same in the evening that has helped me not get bigger than I am now. 

Reply by Jabid, on Sun Oct 20, 2019 6:01 pm

Interesting question indeed and something which has been bothering me for far too long! I am 179cm tall and 90kgs heavy. Like Bill said, I feel like I am pregnant with my stomach bulging out. I have tried controlling my food intake but that did not help at all. 

Reply by w30bob, on Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:36 pm

Hi guys,

 Those last 2 posts caught my attention.  I life-coach a friend for whom life has not been very kind to, and he has a problem with his weight. He's not fat overall, he just looks like he swallowed a beach ball.....literally.  His belly is hard as a rock and he can cross his arms and rest them on his belly while he's talking to you. Kids call him "Humpty Dumpty" and it fits.  So I went with him to see his Primary Care doctor to find out what the hell was going on with his gut. 

 Turns out there's 2 kinds of belly fat.....subcutaneous and visceral fat.  He has the latter, and it's a serious problem. Check out the link below for more detail, but subcutaneous fat is the normal stuff everyone gets that forms just under the skin. Visceral fat forms UNDER your abdominal wall inside your main body cavity......and that's why it's so problematic......it's forming around your intestines and vital organs and not on the outside of your abdominal wall and under your skin. It's not impossible to get rid of visceral fat, but if you have it you need to know what you're dealing with. Not saying you guys have it, but just throwing this out there for your situational awareness.

https://www.healthline.com/health/visceral-fat

Regards,

Bob

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