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Do You Guys Wear A Seat Belt or Not?

Posted by withed, on Wed Aug 28, 2019 7:25 am

I'm sorry to hear you both know people who experienced a traumatic accident in traffic, you don't wish that upon anyone. 

I still find it a pitty you make out the seatbelts as evil. In your story Bob there were other things more wrong. Your dad's friend fell asleep behind the wheel, the heavy toolbox in the back not vastly secured. Those all add up to a tragic accident. 

And Dadnabbit, I'm sorry about your experience with seeing your roommate's tragic death. Seatbelts aren't what they were back in the 70s now though. You can blame so many things during a crash, there's always something. What if the car didn't have a windshield blocking that person's escape. What if the car door wasn't stuck closed. With that train of thought you might as well not drive a car because each part can become the reason a person's life was lost in a tragic accident. 

I'v had a crash with 80 mph and only had a light concussion and a bruise. A friend who had a similar crash broke his collarbone and needed months to recover. Sometimes accidents don't make sense and bad things happen to good people.

 

But to not stray too much of topic, what types of stoma guards are there available? And do special stoma seatbelts exist?

Reply by w30bob, on Wed Aug 28, 2019 10:01 am

Hi withed,

  I fully understand what you're saying about accidents.  I didn't mean for this discussion to degrade into "who thinks what" about whether seat belts should be worn or not, and how folks feel about that.  I was just curious how ostomates dealt with the seat belt "issue", for lack of a better word.  In terms of stoma protectors I think Stoma Guard is a brand name for one specific product.  There are others like Stoma Shield, etc.  If you Google
"stoma protector" you'll get more info than you ever wanted.  These are all basically covers attached to a belt that when worn keep anything from putting pressure directly on your stoma.  Some are aluminum, others plastic, but all basically the same.  For those with less sensitive stomas they make pads that go on the seat belt strap itself to cushion the belt pressure on the stoma.  For my sorry butt I have to deal with high output most of the time, which means when I get stuck in traffic or ate too much before I started to drive, I'll need to empty my bag into a plastic urinal I keep in my car, and do this while driving or in traffic.  So for me I need access to my bag while driving.  Having to remove the stoma protector, hold the urinal and the bottom of my bag and pay attention while driving would be too much of a hassle.  For me..........and I'm not advocating anyone else do as I do..........it's just easier to loop my shoulder belt over my right iknee. This gives me access to my bag, I can easily see how full it is, and drain it without any issues, if need be.  Now I remember seeing something that slips on the seat belt instead of you having to wear it on a belt, but that would be specifically for seat belts and not overall stoma protection.  Bottom line is there are options, and each persons situation is different.  Maybe I should have titled my post........If You Don't Wear a Seat Belt While Driving Do the Cops Hassle You?  Thanks for your replies.

 

regards,

bob

Reply by withed, on Wed Aug 28, 2019 12:00 pm

I remember long ago in the hospital they had bags with a tube exit. Maybe that's something you could benefit from? If you wear a 2 part system you can swap out your bag for one of those when driving and then hook it up to your urinal/container inside your car so any production can flow there without you having to worry about your bag being accessible behind a seatbelt. Not to mention less risk of spillage inside your car.

Reply by Charley, on Wed Aug 28, 2019 1:06 pm
River Birch wrote:
Charley wrote:

Hi Bob,

I wear a seat belt whenever I'm on the road.  I also wear a plastic Stoma Guard all day long.  I'm told that a severely damaged stoma can bleed you out in a hurry.  The guard costs about $50 and is well worth the price for the peace of mind, and it'll keep the cops off your back when you wear your belt correctly.


HI Charley, When I looked into purhasing a stoma guard, I found one that costs about$50 but it attaches to the pouch by velcro and presumably the part that is stuck to the pouch is disposed of when the pouch is changed so the velcro is an item that has to be purchased regularly.  Is this the stoma guard that you purchased?  Is the name Stoma Dome?  Thanks.  


No, Bob.  My stoma guard is hard plastic, about four inches across,  and it fits tightly over the opening in my barrier.  It is held in place with an ostomy belt that attaches to the outer shell.  It is reusable.  I have had mine for several years.  I'll try to locate the exact company name and address and get back to you.

Reply by Charley, on Wed Aug 28, 2019 1:17 pm
Charley wrote:
River Birch wrote:
Charley wrote:

Hi Bob,

I wear a seat belt whenever I'm on the road.  I also wear a plastic Stoma Guard all day long.  I'm told that a severely damaged stoma can bleed you out in a hurry.  The guard costs about $50 and is well worth the price for the peace of mind, and it'll keep the cops off your back when you wear your belt correctly.


HI Charley, When I looked into purhasing a stoma guard, I found one that costs about$50 but it attaches to the pouch by velcro and presumably the part that is stuck to the pouch is disposed of when the pouch is changed so the velcro is an item that has to be purchased regularly.  Is this the stoma guard that you purchased?  Is the name Stoma Dome?  Thanks.  


No, Bob.  My stoma guard is hard plastic, about four inches across,  and it fits tightly over the opening in my barrier.  It is held in place with an ostomy belt that attaches to the outer shell.  It is reusable.  I have had mine for several years.  I'll try to locate the exact company name and address and get back to you.

This Stoma Guard can be found at www.ostomyresolutions.com.  The price has gone up a bit, but I think it is still worth owning.

Reply by LadyHope, on Thu Aug 29, 2019 12:44 pm

Yes, I wear a seatbelt all of the time.  I do my best not to have it rest on my stoma. 

Reply by Ocker, on Thu Aug 29, 2019 11:08 pm

Bob,

In regard to wearing a seatbelt, I have a medical certificate from my local Dr.

that states I have a lifelong medical condition which would be impacted by

wearing a restrictive belt.Granted, the belt would lay directly over the stoma

and could restict flow of urine especially as I have an in-dwelling catheter

directly in the stoma. Howver, the certificate only lasts for 1 year and then I

have to renew it.

One over zealous Police Officer did send me to court but the magistrate threw it out.

Different country's - different rules.

Best of luck,

Ocker

Reply by w30bob, on Fri Aug 30, 2019 9:50 am

Hi Gang,

  Thanks for the responses.  I need to clarify something I said earlier.  I don't loop the shoulder belt portion of the seat belt over my right knee........I loop the waist belt portion of the seat belt over my right knee.  I got looking at it yesterday and realized I mispoke.  My waist belt part of the seat belt passes directly over my stoma, crushing my bag against it and restricting flow.  So far, the few times I've forgotten to loop that portion over my knee I've caught it in time before the barrier seal blew.  Just wanted to be clear on that. 

thanks

bob 

Reply by spyder, on Wed Sep 11, 2019 11:08 am

I use a stoma protector made of carbon fiber it was custom made and is tough and comfy

Reply by Bill, on Wed Sep 11, 2019 11:16 am
spyder wrote:

I use a stoma protector made of carbon fiber it was custom made and is tough and comfy


'CUSTOM MADE'     Now that's what I like to hear. I therefore presume it is much closer to what you really-really want  (- as the song goes).

Best wishes

Bill

Reply by OU812, on Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:28 pm

With regard to the seatbelt question, I just bought something called a Stoma-Dome on Amazon. It's a plastic "dome" with open bottom to allow draining that attaches to my bag using special velcro crescents (that also come with the dome); so no extra belt is needed. It's simple to use and it works great. It protects my stoma and allows me to use my seatbelt without the belt pressing against my stoma. It also lets me wear high-waisted clothes that previously caused pancaking. Hope this helps.

Reply by Tomoc, on Thu Sep 12, 2019 10:42 pm

Hi I do the same as you put on seatbelt across chest pull for slack and then put across left or right knee depending on driver or passenger. Any cop will see belt across your chest but not the fact the belt is not across your belly but across your knee never got stopped or a ticket. They see the strap across your chest. Live on and rock on. 

Reply by Sueaxe, on Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:21 pm

And the below does not account for air bags or the pre charges in a seat
belt 'pull you back system' which activates as an 'almost' instant event as the airbag
is coming at you (did you know about these?! nah, I thought not).
Are people this naive, belligerent, maybe so, or really just thick?
Yeh, I accept sh*t occurs, but to not use, what you are wearing 'incorrectly' is
just daft.


Horse to water scenario
Oh well,
Tc folk
s

. . . .

NSW Centre for Road safety delivers stern message to drivers
Ever pondered the consequences of not wearing your seatbelt correctly in the event of accident?
The NSW Centre for Road Safety has shown the sobering results after conducting a test at its Crashlab facility recently.

Using two dummies (maybe ostomates) – one with the seatbelt worn incorrectly under the arm and the other travelling in a reclined seat, or ‘low riding’ – the centre stowed a Toyota Camry into a wall at 60km/h.
The first dummy wearing a seatbelt under the arm is seen propelled forward into the dashboard, an event that would leave a grim prognosis in a real-life accident, according to stakeholders. The other passenger, seen ‘low riding’, also suffers dire consequences.
“All the force is applied to the abdomen which would probably result in injuries to the liver, spleen, anything within the abdomen,” said Dr Jeremy Hsu, head of Trauma and a surgeon at the Westmead Hospital.
“When it came to the low rider test, [there is] a very high-risk of death and permanent disability.”
The Centre for Road Safety released the vision to coincide with Yellow Ribbon National Road Safety week.
According to official figures, 30 people died on NSW roads last year not wearing a seatbelt or wearing a seatbelt incorrectly.
Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight, Melinda Pavey, said the crash test footage should serve as a warning to road users.
“Think about when you have worn, or have seen someone wear, a seatbelt under the arm to prevent it from rubbing on the neck, or to prevent clothes from being creased, and think about the potential consequences demonstrated in this crash test footage,” Pavey said.
“Another reason is beauty - whether you’re putting on make-up in the mirror or don’t want your spray tan to be smudged, you really need to watch this footage. Vanity is not worth it.”
“Think about when you’ve been tired and reclined your seat as a passenger in a moving car or indeed reclined your seat while driving - as we see with young men ‘low riding’.

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