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Ostomy Memories on New Stuff

 
This is the best website for people with an Ostomy. So much understanding.

AM I A COMPLETE IMBECILE, or just old? I know that we lose points off our IQ as we age, but I figured I at least had a firm grasp on basic common sense. Then I see things that I never would have seen in my younger days and I realize that I must be in a new and different world. The status quo is neither status nor quo.
It is a struggle for me to come to terms with this. I guess I’ve never been as progressive as I thought. I remember “the old days” with fondness, not disdain. Popular singing groups had names like The Four Tops or The Pointer Singers. Now groups have names that sound like hate groups. I saw an article in a magazine about Daft Punk. That’s a singing duo. They are not the Righteous Brothers, I can tell you. I deduced from reading the article about their music that I wouldn’t want to listen to it. Even the reviewer, who apparently liked their album, said “it is some of the worst music I’ve ever heard.” This musical conundrum, far from getting her to question her ultimate judgment of the duo’s sound, leads her to the ultimate absurdity. “This raises the question,” she tells us, “does good music need to be good?”
Now, I don’t know about you, but my answer to that question would be an unqualified YES (she concludes otherwise!). Of course, I plead guilty to believing that a phenomenon such as “rap music” is not, in fact, music. I have quality standards, irrespective of advancements in recording devices and diminishments in musical paradigms. Yet this Daft Punk reviewer, despite observing that some of the stuff on this album is terrible, still concludes it is “brazen and lush” and that Daft Punk “seem to know things that we don’t, and so we can’t be disappointed.” She is saying, I guess, that if she doesn’t like it, she must be wrong, she must not be hip (not to mention hop).
Who am I to say? After all, I listen to Renee Fleming doing an aria from Catalani’s opera “La Wally” and I swoon like a man with weak knees. I like Sonny & Cher. I enjoy MUSIC, but I can’t abide some of the crap that seems to pass as such these days. Then again, perhaps there is nothing new about my reaction. A wag once said, commenting about Richard Wagner’s operatic efforts, that his music was “better than it sounds.” Yesterday’s Wagner is today’s Daft Punk.

 

Nice darts......

MeetAnOstoMate - 28,358 members
 

Hey Henry, did you write this or did I?  

Thanks so much.  I share your feelings about real music as opposed to the crap that's identified as "music" for unknown reasons.

Respectfully,

Mike

 

Hello Henry. 

Tanks for the post but I thought I had already addressed this subject when posting on you previous post about sanity.

"It is quite useful to have somewhere ‘safe’ that we can scream without fear of being locked up and labelled as ‘insane’. I always had a handy soundproof room (which doubled up as a practice room for the would-be music bands who needed such a facility to avoid complaints from neighbours), where people could shut themselves in and scream to their hearts content. (Sometimes the bands had their own people who would do this – but they called them ‘singers’)". 

I find it interesting that most rappers do not refer to their rhyme as 'music', even thought it has a definite beat. It seems to be the marketeers who have labelled it as music so that they have a ready-made marketplace. I quite like rap for it's social comments which have tended to highlight the same sorts of issues that I bring to my own rhymes. However, reciting rhyme to a beat is probably pushing the definition of 'music' to the limit. Although, upon thinking about it a little further, the genre is not too far away from calypso and reggae.  I see it as reflecting the wider notion of modern 'art', which seems to become  more and more obscure, the older I get.

Best wishes

Bill   

 

Hi Henry,  I am right there with you.  I can tolerate very little of what is considered "popular music" today, and I do not define rap as music.  There is no such thing as a rap "song" as it would need to be "sung" to qualify.  My husband, who has been a professional musician all of his adult life, and is 74 years young, thinks that young people today do not have the ability to "listen critically", as they have been exposed to "shlock" all of their lives and been told it's good, so it must be good.  There are young people who appreciate the music that we grew up with, but they are in the minority, mainly due to peer pressure, not wanting to look like weirdos or geeks to their friends.  I consider myself very lucky to have grown up with such amazing music and feel sorry for the young people today.  Real music has been replaced by computers to a large extent.  There is a backlash though, a small movement of young musicians who want to play actual instruments and write intricate melodies and lyrics.  You have to look hard for it though, and even then, I usually find the songwriting lacking. Perhaps there will be a new era of amazing music in another hundred years or so.  I doubt it though.

Terry

 
Bill wrote:

Hello Henry. 

Tanks for the post but I thought I had already addressed this subject when posting on you previous post about sanity.

"It is quite useful to have somewhere ‘safe’ that we can scream without fear of being locked up and labelled as ‘insane’. I always had a handy soundproof room (which doubled up as a practice room for the would-be music bands who needed such a facility to avoid complaints from neighbours), where people could shut themselves in and scream to their hearts content. (Sometimes the bands had their own people who would do this – but they called them ‘singers’)". 

I find it interesting that most rappers do not refer to their rhyme as 'music', even thought it has a definite beat. It seems to be the marketeers who have labelled it as music so that they have a ready-made marketplace. I quite like rap for it's social comments which have tended to highlight the same sorts of issues that I bring to my own rhymes. However, reciting rhyme to a beat is probably pushing the definition of 'music' to the limit. Although, upon thinking about it a little further, the genre is not too far away from calypso and reggae.  I see it as reflecting the wider notion of modern 'art', which seems to become  more and more obscure, the older I get.

Best wishes

Bill   


Hi Bill,  While I can agree with you that rap, occasionally, shows some redeeming value for its social commentary, more often the content leans towards objectifying and demeaning women.

Respectfully,

Terry

 
delgrl525 wrote:


Hi Bill,  While I can agree with you that rap, occasionally, shows some redeeming value for its social commentary, more often the content leans towards objectifying and demeaning women.

Respectfully,

Terry


Hello Terry.
You may well be right in your perception of rap. However, this will probably be the case when it is men doing the rapping. Women rappers tend to have something different to 'say'. Either way, it is often a reflection of what is going on in the rest of society. (I don't like that much either!!)


Many years ago (at Uni), one of the set projects was to do a content analysis on newspaper articles of the time.
I chose to educe and highlight the very points you make about the content objectifying and demeaning women. I also went over and above the basic requirements and investigated those articles which did not have a name attached (and did not exhibit this bias). In every case, the unbiased articles had been written by women. When I enquired as to why the men’s names were on their articles and the women’s were not, I was fobbed off with all sorts of excuses except the obvious one (discrimination).


Fortunately for me, this assignment was marked by a woman. Otherwise, I was confident that it would have attracted some very low marks, if not a ‘fail’.


Best wishes
Bill

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