Meet & talk to fellow OstoMates Support | Friendship | Dating 21,175 members

Ostomy Memories of Hospitals

Posted by HenryM, on Fri Aug 21, 2020 7:49 am

No one disputes that hospitals are doing heroic, extraordinary work through this pandemic. But aside from that, my abhorrence of hospitals abides. Just like every other member of this site, I have been hauled ill into hospitals many times over my years and, so far, have walked out returned to my rather cockamamie status quo, and kudos to the health care workers who brought me around. But these are dreadful places. You lose your humanity when you enter, your dignity disappears with your clothes, and you fall prey to the organized necessity of the E-word: efficiency. All entities that by their nature must funnel a constant flow of people through them – hospitals, courthouses, fast food joints, and the like – must concoct a well-organized and efficient process for dealing with their consumers, whether they’re called patients, litigants, the lunch crowd, or whatever. Places such as these owe a debt to Henry Ford, who perfected the assembly line process. But a patient does not wish to be a cog in the grinding wheel of a hospital ward. It may also be true that the nurse who goes to work there does so out of her unselfish concern for her fellow citizen, but if she is going to survive the unceasing onslaught of patients, the demands of her supervisors, and the impersonal diktat of the clock on the wall, her caring heart is going to eventually have to give ground to the limitations of reality. Being ill is one thing, and it is often very unpleasant. But being ill in a hospital is downright life threatening.

Reply by Padfoot, on Fri Aug 21, 2020 9:00 am

I agree completely, Henry. There are ways to fight back, though. I find it very effective to tell medical staff what my needs are in advance, ie "I need to you tell me what you are going to do before you do it, so I know what to expect". Asking to have things repeated and explained (several times if necessary) is a way of ensuring you don't leave without understanding what has been said. Sticking to my guns when I am told my pain is all in my head (once was during an ectopic pregnancy!) is something that most women have to learn to do - there are infinite studies that talk about how women's pain is minimized. All of the above is only possible when you are conscious and have the strength to be assertive. There are other ways, however. Becoming a patient advocate, after the fact, is one way of being heard. Isn't that what we're doing on this site? Contacting the patient advocate at the hospital to explain how things could improve, is something I have done several times. And I keep in touch, to make sure my concerns have been followed up on. I also like to participate in public consultations with regulatory Colleges - the College of Physicians and Surgeons in particular - when they are revising policies. I have a lot to say about medical policy in my province, and I find they actually do listen to the public. First, I research what other jurisdictions around the world are doing, in case adding that would bolster my position. And finally, there is always the possibility of filing a formal complaint. I have done that twice; once with the hospital, and once with the College. Satisfactory outcomes both times. Patients are human beings, with rights, dignity and value beyond our role as patients. It is in our best interests to never let them forget that. 

Laurie

Reply by HenryM, on Fri Aug 21, 2020 9:07 am
Padfoot wrote:

I agree completely, Henry. There are ways to fight back, though. I find it very effective to tell medical staff what my needs are in advance, ie "I need to you tell me what you are going to do before you do it, so I know what to expect". Asking to have things repeated and explained (several times if necessary) is a way of ensuring you don't leave without understanding what has been said. Sticking to my guns when I am told my pain is all in my head (once was during an ectopic pregnancy!) is something that most women have to learn to do - there are infinite studies that talk about how women's pain is minimized. All of the above is only possible when you are conscious and have the strength to be assertive. There are other ways, however. Becoming a patient advocate, after the fact, is one way of being heard. Isn't that what we're doing on this site? Contacting the patient advocate at the hospital to explain how things could improve, is something I have done several times. And I keep in touch, to make sure my concerns have been followed up on. I also like to participate in public consultations with regulatory Colleges - the College of Physicians and Surgeons in particular - when they are revising policies. I have a lot to say about medical policy in my province, and I find they actually do listen to the public. First, I research what other jurisdictions around the world are doing, in case adding that would bolster my position. And finally, there is always the possibility of filing a formal complaint. I have done that twice; once with the hospital, and once with the College. Satisfactory outcomes both times. Patients are human beings, with rights, dignity and value beyond our role as patients. It is in our best interests to never let them forget that. 

Laurie

Good for you, Laurie.  

Reply by Bill, on Fri Aug 21, 2020 10:35 am

Well said Henry.

Once again, when I find myself in a debilitating and dehumanising situation, I turn to the written word  in the form of rhyme, to document my thoughts and feelings as the experience unravels.

I managed to get three books out of the stoma experience and one from my triple heart bi-pass. That's on a very personal level. However, when it comes to helping other people with traumatic  events and experiences, I pride myself on being able to listen and empathise enough to be able to accurately document their traumas /feelings/reactions etc. in a similar way.  I can then present them with the completed rhyme so that they can see that 'someone' listened. It's a technique I have labelled 'in-verse feedback' and it has been very well received by those in need of such support.

Best wishes

Bill  

Reply by eddie, on Sat Aug 22, 2020 9:29 am
HenryM wrote:
Padfoot wrote:

I agree completely, Henry. There are ways to fight back, though. I find it very effective to tell medical staff what my needs are in advance, ie "I need to you tell me what you are going to do before you do it, so I know what to expect". Asking to have things repeated and explained (several times if necessary) is a way of ensuring you don't leave without understanding what has been said. Sticking to my guns when I am told my pain is all in my head (once was during an ectopic pregnancy!) is something that most women have to learn to do - there are infinite studies that talk about how women's pain is minimized. All of the above is only possible when you are conscious and have the strength to be assertive. There are other ways, however. Becoming a patient advocate, after the fact, is one way of being heard. Isn't that what we're doing on this site? Contacting the patient advocate at the hospital to explain how things could improve, is something I have done several times. And I keep in touch, to make sure my concerns have been followed up on. I also like to participate in public consultations with regulatory Colleges - the College of Physicians and Surgeons in particular - when they are revising policies. I have a lot to say about medical policy in my province, and I find they actually do listen to the public. First, I research what other jurisdictions around the world are doing, in case adding that would bolster my position. And finally, there is always the possibility of filing a formal complaint. I have done that twice; once with the hospital, and once with the College. Satisfactory outcomes both times. Patients are human beings, with rights, dignity and value beyond our role as patients. It is in our best interests to never let them forget that. 

Laurie

Good for you, Laurie.  


Medical staff sure getting a bashing, wish you all could spend one 12 hour shift in my shoes

Reply by Padfoot, on Sat Aug 22, 2020 9:55 am
eddie wrote:
HenryM wrote:
Padfoot wrote:

I agree completely, Henry. There are ways to fight back, though. I find it very effective to tell medical staff what my needs are in advance, ie "I need to you tell me what you are going to do before you do it, so I know what to expect". Asking to have things repeated and explained (several times if necessary) is a way of ensuring you don't leave without understanding what has been said. Sticking to my guns when I am told my pain is all in my head (once was during an ectopic pregnancy!) is something that most women have to learn to do - there are infinite studies that talk about how women's pain is minimized. All of the above is only possible when you are conscious and have the strength to be assertive. There are other ways, however. Becoming a patient advocate, after the fact, is one way of being heard. Isn't that what we're doing on this site? Contacting the patient advocate at the hospital to explain how things could improve, is something I have done several times. And I keep in touch, to make sure my concerns have been followed up on. I also like to participate in public consultations with regulatory Colleges - the College of Physicians and Surgeons in particular - when they are revising policies. I have a lot to say about medical policy in my province, and I find they actually do listen to the public. First, I research what other jurisdictions around the world are doing, in case adding that would bolster my position. And finally, there is always the possibility of filing a formal complaint. I have done that twice; once with the hospital, and once with the College. Satisfactory outcomes both times. Patients are human beings, with rights, dignity and value beyond our role as patients. It is in our best interests to never let them forget that. 

Laurie

Good for you, Laurie.  


Medical staff sure getting a bashing, wish you all could spend one 12 hour shift in my shoes

Yes, Eddie, I'm sure it would be an eye opener.

My post did sound very one-sided. Let me correct that by saying that the vast majority of healthcare workers that I have met have been respectful, and treated me with dignity. However, as in all professions, there are a few whose people skills need a lot of work. And institutions that cut corners resulting in patients who feel like numbers rather than human beings. Those are the ones to whom I was referring in my post. I have two acquaintances who worked in hospital Patient Relations briefly, feeling the need to quit after only a few years. What they both told me, is that it is soul-sucking to work in an institution that only pays lip service to caring about its clientele. That, unfortunately, speaks for itself.

 

Laurie

Reply by eddie, on Sat Aug 22, 2020 10:51 am
Padfoot wrote:
eddie wrote:
HenryM wrote:
Padfoot wrote:

I agree completely, Henry. There are ways to fight back, though. I find it very effective to tell medical staff what my needs are in advance, ie "I need to you tell me what you are going to do before you do it, so I know what to expect". Asking to have things repeated and explained (several times if necessary) is a way of ensuring you don't leave without understanding what has been said. Sticking to my guns when I am told my pain is all in my head (once was during an ectopic pregnancy!) is something that most women have to learn to do - there are infinite studies that talk about how women's pain is minimized. All of the above is only possible when you are conscious and have the strength to be assertive. There are other ways, however. Becoming a patient advocate, after the fact, is one way of being heard. Isn't that what we're doing on this site? Contacting the patient advocate at the hospital to explain how things could improve, is something I have done several times. And I keep in touch, to make sure my concerns have been followed up on. I also like to participate in public consultations with regulatory Colleges - the College of Physicians and Surgeons in particular - when they are revising policies. I have a lot to say about medical policy in my province, and I find they actually do listen to the public. First, I research what other jurisdictions around the world are doing, in case adding that would bolster my position. And finally, there is always the possibility of filing a formal complaint. I have done that twice; once with the hospital, and once with the College. Satisfactory outcomes both times. Patients are human beings, with rights, dignity and value beyond our role as patients. It is in our best interests to never let them forget that. 

Laurie

Good for you, Laurie.  


Medical staff sure getting a bashing, wish you all could spend one 12 hour shift in my shoes

Yes, Eddie, I'm sure it would be an eye opener.

My post did sound very one-sided. Let me correct that by saying that the vast majority of healthcare workers that I have met have been respectful, and treated me with dignity. However, as in all professions, there are a few whose people skills need a lot of work. And institutions that cut corners resulting in patients who feel like numbers rather than human beings. Those are the ones to whom I was referring in my post. I have two acquaintances who worked in hospital Patient Relations briefly, feeling the need to quit after only a few years. What they both told me, is that it is soul-sucking to work in an institution that only pays lip service to caring about its clientele. That, unfortunately, speaks for itself.

 

Laurie

there are good and bad in every profession, I agree with what you are saying, I for one always treated patients as I would want to be treated, did my best

 

Reply by eddie, on Sat Aug 22, 2020 10:54 am
Padfoot wrote:
eddie wrote:
HenryM wrote:
Padfoot wrote:

I agree completely, Henry. There are ways to fight back, though. I find it very effective to tell medical staff what my needs are in advance, ie "I need to you tell me what you are going to do before you do it, so I know what to expect". Asking to have things repeated and explained (several times if necessary) is a way of ensuring you don't leave without understanding what has been said. Sticking to my guns when I am told my pain is all in my head (once was during an ectopic pregnancy!) is something that most women have to learn to do - there are infinite studies that talk about how women's pain is minimized. All of the above is only possible when you are conscious and have the strength to be assertive. There are other ways, however. Becoming a patient advocate, after the fact, is one way of being heard. Isn't that what we're doing on this site? Contacting the patient advocate at the hospital to explain how things could improve, is something I have done several times. And I keep in touch, to make sure my concerns have been followed up on. I also like to participate in public consultations with regulatory Colleges - the College of Physicians and Surgeons in particular - when they are revising policies. I have a lot to say about medical policy in my province, and I find they actually do listen to the public. First, I research what other jurisdictions around the world are doing, in case adding that would bolster my position. And finally, there is always the possibility of filing a formal complaint. I have done that twice; once with the hospital, and once with the College. Satisfactory outcomes both times. Patients are human beings, with rights, dignity and value beyond our role as patients. It is in our best interests to never let them forget that. 

Laurie

Good for you, Laurie.  


Medical staff sure getting a bashing, wish you all could spend one 12 hour shift in my shoes

Yes, Eddie, I'm sure it would be an eye opener.

My post did sound very one-sided. Let me correct that by saying that the vast majority of healthcare workers that I have met have been respectful, and treated me with dignity. However, as in all professions, there are a few whose people skills need a lot of work. And institutions that cut corners resulting in patients who feel like numbers rather than human beings. Those are the ones to whom I was referring in my post. I have two acquaintances who worked in hospital Patient Relations briefly, feeling the need to quit after only a few years. What they both told me, is that it is soul-sucking to work in an institution that only pays lip service to caring about its clientele. That, unfortunately, speaks for itself.

 

Laurie

forgot to add I work in a tiny hospital, but we rate 5 stars out of five in Nursing, this is patient ratings

 

* Please, do not post contact information like email, Facebook or Twitter accounts, or phone number. These will be removed by the Administrator.
All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Currently online: 8    
3 members & 5 visitors
panguy (m)
Ritz (f)
 
 
Welcome to MeetAnOstoMate - the largest online community for people with an ostomy.
If you have questions or just want to meet and chat with others, join us and enjoy our great community.