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A Little Worried

Posted: Tue Nov 18, 2014 9:01 am

I am on a waiting list for an urostomy,but have a few worries and questions.

Thesse are

pain post op,how much pain will i be in when i get home.

Will i be able to move about.

The main one is the wound drain will it hurt when they take it out.  When they change the catheter the pain is so bad I cry out in pain. My worry is when they take the wound drain out it will be as painfull

How long roughly is the total recovery time.

Also I have read that you get losse bowel movements or go the other way i would be worried that straining to pass a bm could tear or damage the joined bowel stitched small bowel.

Any one who can help me with thesse worries I would be most thank full

a great big thank in advance

  Past Member
Posted: Tue Nov 18, 2014 10:14 am

I had my urostomy 7 years ago now, best thing I ever did.  You will have to get used to a different routine, sleeping on one side of the bed because of the night bag, etc but the difference for me was getting a full nights sleep. 

As to your questions, the post op pain was negligable due to an excellent gas man who gave me a spinal anaesthetic. The surgeon was good and apart from the usual strong twinges post op there was nothing exceptional. 

It is vital to establish a rapport with your stoma nurse to get your stoma care routine sttled as soon as possible and expect up to 3 months to finaly get it to where you barely notice it.

Try support on Stoma Selfie Awareness, a subgroup on facebook, where there are many in your situation, I have found them to be a very open and honest group with no obvious dating.

Hotrock

 

Posted: Tue Nov 18, 2014 10:32 am

 thanks for reply I know all about night bags as i have used one for 8 years. I have a supapubic cathter,but my body is constanly rejecting it.

cant wait for op i will be pain free and have my life back

  Past Member
Posted: Tue Nov 18, 2014 10:45 am

Forget all the discomfort of catheters.  This is nothing like that.  I had lots of experience of catheters and I still can not understand how some blokes do it for fun.

I was mobile after 24 hours and apart from sleeping on a mattress protector until I got used to my stoma and was able to manage it so that I didn't get leaks at night, almost everything changed for the better. I can't imagine anything being near what you suffer from catheter removal.  there is some pain, treatable, and discomfort, which quickly dies away, but I am really glad I did it.  It does have problems but they are nothing compared to pre-op.  Good luck.

John

Posted: Tue Nov 18, 2014 11:11 am

If you are UK , you will not be allowed to leave Hosp untill your surgeon says so , by which time any pain should have subsided to contollable levels . I made a full recovery Bladder out , stoma made , Llymph glands removed , Prostate removed . I had 3 days in high dependency ward & 2 on general ward .I was up & driving my car a week after I got home . I then took a leisurely 3 months off recovering beforeI returned to work . However after being back at work for 6 months , my fatigue levels were down a bit  so I gave it all up & retired 3 yrs early .Havnt looked back  , do most things I want & enjoyingg life ....

Posted: Mon Nov 24, 2014 10:23 pm

I had surprisingly little pain after surgery, it's amazing how strong our bodies actually are.

The wound drain... my removal was painless, but it was a heck of a surprise to feel it pop out of me.  Like you, catheters were always very painful for me, drain removal was relatively painless as far as I remember.

I was able to move about and could drive after 2 weeks.  By then I had enough strength to go out to the local food store, but not larger food & other large stores.  Going thru large stores took more steps than I had in me at the time. If I walked too much I felt like a battery that was about to wear down. If I pushed myself that far I would feel exhausted.  Energy comes back gradually, able to do pretty much anything after 3 months (nothing extremely strenuous), about 5 or 6 months for me to get back to 100%, but I've known others with quicker results.  Felt OK the whole time, I just tired easily.

Whilein hospital they put a tube down the nose to keep the stomach empty of stomach acids in order to let the bowel heal. 

I worried about straining during a bm but had no problems.

My Best to You,

Keith

 

Posted: Tue Nov 25, 2014 2:49 am

Hi,  

My name is Marsha, and although I don't have an urostomy, ( I have an ileostomy) I've had about 12 surgical procedures  in the last 50 years.... some related to the ostomy...others not. 

But each procedure came with it's own anxieties, and issues.  Years ago, they really kept you in the hospital longer, so pain management, and complications were handled there.  These days, hospitals & insurance, tries to get you out as quickly as possible. 

My suggestion to you is to speak to  your doctor before surgery, and make sure you'll have pain meds on demand, if you need them.   I had kidney stone surgery removal last winter....and I can honestly say I felt no pain.  But I did have other complications, so it's always helpful to have a friend or family member around to advocate for you.   If you don't think youre ready to go home....then fight to stay longer.  The reverse is also true....

I think I've had more catheters / drains removed than I can count.   And that's what they usually have you do....count...even if it hurts...it passes quickly.  

Recovery can be tricky.   It always feels better to "just stay put", but getting up and about as soon as possible, doing a little more each day, is really the best way to recover .  Most important is to recognize when "enough is enough", and rest when you need to.   I've learned over the years, and with each procedure, to have "no expectations", and just to go with the flow.  Sorry...didn't mean to be "Punny:.    Best of luck to  you.

 

Marsha

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